October 13, 2016

Anne Brontë Quotes

“A girl’s affections should never be won unsought.”

“A good honest answer – wonderful for a girl!”

“A light wind swept over the corn, and all nature laughed in the sunshine.”

“A man can live without his money as merrily as a tortoise without its head, or a wasp without its body.”

“Alas! poor Milicent, what encouragement can I give you? – or what advice – except that it is better to make a bold stand now, though at the expense of disappointing and angering both mother and brother, and lover, than to devote your whole life, hereafter, to misery and vain regret?”

“All novels are, or should be, written for both men and women to read, and I am at loss to conceive how a man should permit himself to write anything that would be really disgraceful to a woman, or why a woman should be censured for writing anything that would be proper and becoming for a man.”

“At your time of life, it’s love that rules the roast: at mine, it’s solid, serviceable gold.”

“Beauty is that quality which, next to money, is generally the most attractive to the worst kinds of men; and, therefore, it is likely to entail a great deal of trouble on the possessor.”

“But he that dares not grasp the thorn Should never crave the rose.”

“But then to wake and find it flown, The dream of happiness destroyed, To find myself unloved, alone, What tongue can speak the dreary void? A heart whence warm affections flow, Creator, thou hast given to me, And am I only thus to know How sweet the joys of love would be?”

“God have mercy on his miserable soul! and make him see and feel his guilt – I ask no other vengeance! If he could but fully know and truly feel my wrongs I should be well avenged, and I could freely pardon all.”

“God will judge us by our own thoughts and deeds, not by what others say about us.”

“He despises me, because he knows I love him.”

“He knows he is my sun, but when he chooses to withhold his light, he would have my sky to be all darkness; he cannot bear that I should have a moon to mitigate the deprivation.”

“High time, my girl – high time! Moderation in all things, remember. That’s the plan—Let your moderation be known unto all men!”

“His heart was like a sensitive plant, that opens for a moment in the sunshine, but curls up and shrinks into itself at the slightest touch of the finger, or the lightest breath of wind.”

“How sweet to feel its helpless form Depending thus on me alone! And while I hold it safe and warm What bliss to think it is my own! To feel my hand so kindly prest, To know myself beloved at last, To think my heart has found a rest, My life of solitude is past!”

“I am truly miserable – more so than I like to acknowledge to myself. Pride refuses to aid me. It has brought me into the scrape, and will not help me out of it.”

“I ask not how remote the day Nor what the sinner’s woe Before their dross is purged away, Enough for me to know That when the cup of wrath is drained, The metal purified, They’ll cling to what they once disdained, And live by Him that died.”

“I do believe a young lady can’t be too careful who she marries.”

“I ever give a thought to another, you may well spare it, for those fancies are here and gone like a flash of lightning, while my love for you burns on steadily, and for ever, like the sun.”

“I have often wished in vain,’ said she, ‘for another’s judgment to appeal to when I could scarcely trust the direction of my own eye and head, they having been so long occupied with the contemplation of a single object as to become almost incapable of forming a proper idea respecting it.”

“I imagine, there must be only a very, very few men in the world that I should like to marry; and of those few, it is ten to one I may never be acquainted with one; or if I should, it is twenty to one he may not happen to be single, or to take a fancy to me.”

“I know I owe my all to Thee, O, take this heart I cannot give. Do Thou my Strength my Saviour be; And make me to Thy glory live!”

“I perceive the backs of young ladies’ drawings, like the postscripts of their letters, are the most important and interesting part of the concern.”

“I perceive, with joy, my most valued friend, that the cloud of your displeasure has past away; the light of your countenance blesses me once more, and you desire the continuation of my story: therefore, without more ado, you shall have it.”

“I possess the faculty of enjoying the company of those I – of my friends as well in silence as in conversation.”

“I see that a man cannot give himself up to drinking without being miserable one half his days and mad the other; besides, I like to enjoy my life at all sides and ends, which cannot be done by one that suffers himself to be the slave of a single propensity.”

“I thought Mr. Millward never would cease telling us that he was no tea-drinker, and that it was highly injurious to keep loading the stomach with slops to the exclusion of more wholesome sustenance, and so give himself time to finish his fourth cup.”

“I tried to cheer her up, and apparently succeeded in some degree, before the walk was over; but in the very act my conscience reproved me, knowing, as I did, that, sooner or later, the tie must be broken, and this was only nourishing false hopes and putting off the evil day.”

“I went home very happy, with a heart brimful of complacency for myself, and overflowing with love for Eliza.”

“I wish I could see how the ocean is lashing The foam of its billows to whirlwinds of spray; I wish I could see how its proud waves are dashing, And hear the wild roar of their thunder today!”

“I would not send a poor girl into the world, ignorant of the snares that beset her path; nor would I watch and guard her, till, deprived of self-respect and self-reliance, she lost the power or the will to watch and guard herself.”

“If ever I am a mother I will zealously strive against this crime of over- indulgence. I can hardly give it a milder name when I think of the evils it brings.”

“If I hate the sins, I love the sinner, and would do much for his salvation.”

“If we can only speak to slander our betters, let us hold our tongues.”

“If you choose to visit the bottomless pit, I won’t go with you – we must part company, for I swear I’ll not move another step towards it!”

“If you mean Mr. Weston to be one of your victims, said I, with affected indifference, you will have to make such overtures yourself that you will find it difficult to draw back when he asks you to fulfil the expectations you have raised.”

“If you would have a boy to despise his mother, let her keep him at home, and spend her life in petting him up, and slaving to indulge his follies and caprices.”

“If you would have your son to walk honourably through the world, you must not attempt to clear the stones from his path, but teach him to walk firmly over them — not insist upon leading him by the hand, but let him learn to go alone. “

“If you would really study my pleasure, mother, you must consider your own comfort and convenience a little more than you do.”

“If your wife gives you her heart, you must take it, thankfully, and use it well, and not pull it in pieces, and laugh in her face, because she cannot snatch it away.”

“I’ll promise to think twice before I take any important step you seriously disapprove of.”

“In love affairs, there is no mediator like a merry, simple-hearted child – ever ready to cement divided hearts, to span the unfriendly gulf of custom, to melt the ice of cold reserve, and overthrow the separating walls of dread formality and pride.”

“It is a woman’s nature to be constant – to love one and one only, blindly, tenderly, and for ever.”

“It is better to arm and strengthen your hero, than to disarm and enfeeble your foe.”

“It is natural for our unamiable sex to dislike the creatures, for you ladies lavish so many caresses upon them.”

“It is not money my aunt thinks about. She knows better than to value worldly wealth above its price.”

“It’s well to have such a comfortable assurance regarding the worth of those we love. I only wish you may not find your confidence misplaced.”

“My cup of sweets is not unmingled: it is dashed with a bitterness that I cannot hide from myself, disguise it as I will.”

“My God! O let me call Thee mine! Weak, wretched sinner though I be, My trembling soul would fain be Thine, My feeble faith still clings to Thee.”

“My soul is awakened, my spirit is soaring And carried aloft on the wings of the breeze; For above and around me the wild wind is roaring, Arousing to rapture the earth and the seas.”

“No indulgence for you, Mr. Huntingdon, must come between me and the consideration of my niece’s happiness.”

“No one can be happy in eternal solitude.”

“Oh, I am very weary, Though tears no longer flow; My eyes are tired of weeping, My heart is sick of woe.”

“Oh, Richard! exclaimed she, on one occasion, if you would but dismiss such gloomy subjects from your mind, you would live as long as any of us; at least you would live to see the girls married, and yourself a happy grandfather, with a canty old dame for your companion.”

“She was trusted and valued by her father, loved and courted by all dogs, cats, children, and poor people, and slighted and neglected by everybody else.”

“She, however, attentively watched my looks, and her artist’s pride was gratified, no doubt, to read my heartfelt admiration in my eyes.”

“Since I love him so much, I can easily forgive him for loving himself”

“Smiles and tears are so alike with me, they are neither of them confined to any particular feelings: I often cry when I am happy, and smile when I am sad.”

“That none deserve eternal bliss I know: Unmerited the grace in mercy given, But none shall sink to everlasting woe That have not well deserved the wrath of Heaven.”

“The brightest attractions to the lover too often prove the husband’s greatest torments”

“The demon of drink was as black as the demon of play, and nearly as hard to get rid of – especially as his kind friends did all they could to second the promptings of his own insatiable cravings.”

“The greater the happiness that nature sets before me, the more I lament that he is not here to taste it: the greater the bliss we might enjoy together, the more I feel our present wretchedness apart.”

“The more you loved your God the more deep and pure and true would be your love to me.”

“There goes the dinner-bell, and here comes my aunt to scold me for sitting here at my desk all day, instead of staying with the company: wish the company were – gone.”

“There is always a ‘but’ in this imperfect world.”

“There is such a thing as looking through a person’s eyes into the heart, and learning more of the height, and breadth, and depth of another’s soul in one hour than it might take you a lifetime to discover, if he or she were not disposed to reveal it, or if you had not the sense to understand it.”

“This is double selfishness displayed to me and to the victims of his former love.”

“To wheedle and coax is safer than to command.”

“What are you, sir, that you should set yourself up as a god, and presume to dispute possession of my heart with Him to whom I owe all I have and all I am, every blessing I ever did or ever can enjoy – and yourself among the rest – if you are a blessing, which I am half inclined to doubt.”

“When a lady condescends to apologise, there is no keeping one’s anger.”

“When a lady does consent to listen to an argument against her own opinions, she is always predetermined to withstand it – to listen only with her bodily ears, keeping the mental organs resolutely closed against the strongest reasoning.”

“When I spend my money I like to enjoy the full value of it.”

“While on my lonely couch I lie, I seldom feel myself alone, For fancy fills my dreaming eye With scenes and pleasures of its own. Then I may cherish at my breast An infant’s form beloved and fair, May smile and soothe it into rest With all a Mother’s fondest care.”

“Yet, should thy darkest fears be true, If Heaven be so severe, That such a soul as thine is lost, Oh! how shall I appear?”

“You may have as many words as you please, – only I can’t stay to hear them.”

“You may think it all very fine, Mr. Huntingdon, to amuse yourself with rousing my jealousy; but take care you don’t rouse my hate instead. And when you have once extinguished my love, you will find it no easy matter to kindle it again.”

“You will form a very inadequate estimate of a man’s character, if you judge by what a fond sister says of him. The worst of them generally know how to hide their misdeeds from their sisters’ eyes, and their mother’s, too.”

“You’ve been weeping, I see – that’s our grand resource, you know. But doesn’t it make your eyes smart? and do you always find it to answer?”