November 30, 2016

Galileo Galilei Quotes

“All truths are easy to understand once they are discovered; the point is to discover them.”

“And who can doubt that it will lead to the worst disorders when minds created free by God are compelled to submit slavishly to an outside will? When we are told to deny our senses and subject them to the will of others?”

“By denying scientific principles, one may maintain any paradox.”

“Did not ignore the Bible, but he knew very well that if his doctrine were proved, then it could not contradict the Scriptures when they were rightly understood.”

“Eppur si muove. – Supposedly said in 1632 before the Inquisition after being forced to deny that the earth moves around the sun. Earliest report of this quote can be found in the book “The Italian Library” by Giuseppe Baretti, published in 1757.”

“Facts which at first seem improbable will, even on scant explanation, drop the cloak which has hidden them and stand forth in naked and simple beauty.”

“I do not feel obliged to believe that the same God who has endowed us with sense, reason, and intellect has intended us to forgo their use.”

“I do not feel obliged to believe that the same God who has endowed us with senses, reason, and intellect has intended us to forgo their use and by some other means to give us knowledge which we can attain by them.”

“I think that in the discussion of natural problems we ought to begin not with the Scriptures, but with experiments, and demonstrations.”

“I would say here something that was heard from an ecclesiastic of the most eminent degree: The intention of the Holy Spirit is to teach us how one goes to heaven, not how the heavens go.”

“If I were again beginning my studies, I would follow the advice of Plato and start with mathematics.”

“If you could see the earth illuminated when you were in a place as dark as night, it would look to you more splendid than the moon.”

“In questions of science, the authority of a thousand is not worth the humble reasoning of a single individual.”

“It is surely harmful to souls to make it a heresy to believe what is proved.”

“It vexes me when they would constrain science by the authority of the Scriptures, and yet do not consider themselves bound to answer reason and experiment.”

“Light held together by moisture.”

“Long experience has taught me this about the status of mankind with regard to matters requiring thought: the less people know and understand about them, the more positively they attempt to argue concerning them, while on the other hand to know and understand a multitude of things renders men cautious in passing judgement upon anything new.”

“Mathematics is the language in which God has written the universe.”

“Measure what is measurable, and make measurable what is not so.”

“My dear Kepler, what would you say of the learned here, who, replete with the pertinacity of the asp, have steadfastly refused to cast a glance through the telescope? What shall we make of this? Shall we laugh, or shall we cry?”

“Names and attributes must be accommodated to the essence of things, and not the essence to the names, since things come first and names afterwards.”

“Nature is relentless and unchangeable, and it is indifferent as to whether its hidden reasons and actions are understandable to man or not.”

“Philosophy is written in this grand book, the universe, which stands continually open to our gaze…. It is written in the language of mathematics, and its characters are triangles, circles, and other geometric figures without which… one wanders about in a dark labyrinth.”

“The difficulties in the study of the infinite arise because we attempt, with our finite minds, to discuss the infinite, assigning to it those properties which we give to the finite and limited; but this… is wrong, for we cannot speak of infinite quantities as being the one greater or less than or equal to another.”

“The laws of Nature are written in the language of mathematics… the symbols are triangles, circles and other geometrical figures, without whose help it is impossible to comprehend a single word.”

“The Milky Way is nothing else but a mass of innumerable stars planted together in clusters.”

“The sun, with all those planets revolving around it and dependent on it, can still ripen a bunch of grapes as if it had nothing else in the universe to do.”

“To apply oneself to great inventions, starting from the smallest beginnings, is no task for ordinary minds; to divine that wonderful arts lie hid behind trivial and childish things is a conception for superhuman talents.”

“We cannot teach people anything; we can only help them discover it within themselves.”

“We must say that there are as many squares as there are numbers.”

“What has philosophy got to do with measuring anything? It’s the mathematicians you have to trust, and they measure the skies like we measure a field.”

“Where the senses fail us, reason must step in.”

“Wine is sunlight, held together by water.”

“You cannot teach a man anything; you can only help him find it within himself.”