November 10, 2016

Maeve Binchy Quotes

“Always write as if you are talking to someone. It works. Don’t put on any fancy phrases or accents or things you wouldn’t say in real life.”

“As a memorial, I’d like a statue. Not of me, but a little modern statue, in marble or bronze, maybe of a bird, in a park where children could play and people going by could see it. On it, I’d just like it to say: ‘Maeve Binchy, storyteller’ and people could look at the name and remember that they’d seen it somewhere else.”

“Because I saw my parents relaxing in armchairs and reading and liking it, I thought it was a peaceful grown-up thing to do, and I still think that.”

“Everybody is a hero in their own story if you just look.”

“Happiness is in our own hearts. I have no regrets of anything in the past. I’m totally cheerful and happy, and I think that a lot of your attitude is not in the circumstances you find yourself in, but in the circumstances you make for yourself.”

“I didn’t have a sweet tooth, but I liked butter, and I liked sauces, and I liked wine… and curry… and cheeses.”

“I don’t have ugly ducklings turning into swans in my stories. I have ugly ducklings turn into confident ducks.”

“I had a very happy childhood, which is unsuitable if you’re going to be an Irish writer.”

“I have always believed that life is too short for rows and disagreements. Even if I think I’m right, I would prefer to apologize and remain friends rather than win and be an enemy.”

“I have been blessed with friends who do things rather than buy things: friends who will change books at the library, take a bag of your old clothes to a thrift store, bring you cuttings and plant them in a window box, fill the bird feeder in your garden when you can’t get out.”

“I have been luckier than anyone I know or even heard of. I had a very happy childhood, a good education, I enjoyed working as a teacher, journalist and author. I have loved a wonderful man for over 33 years, and I believe he loves me, too.”

“I never wanted to write. I just wrote letters home from a kibbutz in Israel to reassure my parents that I was still alive and well fed and having a great time. They thought these letters were brilliant and sent them to a newspaper. So I became a writer by accident.”

“I once tried to write a novel about revenge. It’s the only book I didn’t finish. I couldn’t get into the mind of the person who was plotting vengeance.”

“I suppose, to be fair, I don’t miss the energy of youth very much – because I was never fit. So it doesn’t matter not being able to walk miles, striding the countryside, taking deep breaths and enjoying the scenery. That was never on my agenda.”

“I think I was dealt a good hand. I have happy genes.”

“I was lucky enough to be fairly quick at understanding what was taught, but unlucky enough not to be really interested in it, so I always got my exams but never had the scholar’s love of learning for its own sake.”

“I’m particularly fond of boned chicken breasts with a little garlic under the flesh and cooked in a casserole for 40 minutes with a jar of olives, some cherry tomatoes and a spoonful of olive oil.”

“I’ve been very lucky and I have a happy old age with good family and friends still around.”

“Most people, once the money started getting bigger, thought we would buy a millionaire’s house looking out at the sea – but what would two middle-aged people do that for? We were sensible enough when we got it.”

“My mother hoped I would meet a nice doctor or barrister or accountant who would marry me and take me to live in what is now called Fashionable Dublin Four. But she felt that this was a vain hope. I was a bit loud to make a nice professional wife, and anyway, I was too keen on spending my holidays in far flung places to meet any of these people.”

“Nobody is ordinary if you know where to look.”

“The great thing about getting older is that you become more mellow. Things aren’t as black and white, and you become much more tolerant. You can see the good in things much more easily rather than getting enraged as you used to do when you were young.”

“There are no makeovers in my books. The ugly duckling does not become a beautiful swan. She becomes a confident duck able to take charge of her own life and problems.”

“We are all the heroes and heroines of our own lives. Our love stories are amazingly romantic; our losses and betrayals and disappointments are gigantic in our own minds.”

“We have to make our own happiness, and we have to make our own decisions and play the hand that is dealt to us.”

“When I was being brought up, we weren’t allowed to wallow in self-pity, which was a thoroughly good thing. We were all fine and healthy because that was what we were told to be.”